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How many bees does it take to produce a teaspoon of honey?

Teaspoon of Honey

It’s that time of the year as the weather warms and the bees start buzzing happily in the countryside.  Today, as we had our daily dose of delicious health-enhancing raw honey, at DrBeekeeper we asked the question – how many bees does it take to produce a teaspoon of honey? Any guesses?

Incredibly, on average a worker bee will produce 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey in their lifetime.  So it takes 12 worker bees to produce a single teaspoon of honey!  Taking that further, to produce 0.5lb (227g) of DrBeekeeper honey it takes about 30,000 bees travelling 27,500 miles and visiting more than a million flowers to gather the nectar required.DrBeekeeper English Wildflower Honey with Gift Jute Bag

We can’t wait to see the bees this weekend as the weather warms above 12C so it’s warm enough to open the hive and check their all OK.  Bees truly are the most incredible, special little miracle workers who sweeten our day!

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DrBeekeeper’s Honey Caramel Apples

Why not celebrate halloween with these delicious honey caramel apples using DrBeekeeper Honey?

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 6 medium apples
  • 1 cup DrBeekeeper honey
  • ¾ cup double cream
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ cup crushed DrBeekeeper honey roasted pecans
  • ice cubes
  • 6 sticks

Method

  1. Whisk honey, cream, butter and salt in a saucepan over medium heat until it bubbles, then immediately reduce heat to simmer.
  2. Continue whisking the caramel to prevent burning and spillage. Continue cooking the caramel until the temperature reaches 125 C (about 25 minutes). The caramel should thicken and turn a rich brown colour and the bubbles should be small and should uniformly cover the surface of the pan.
  3. Make an ice bath by placing ice cubes in a bowl. Then transfer the hot caramel into a mixing bowl and place the bowl in the ice bath. Stir the caramel until it is cooled and starts to thicken.
  4. Insert a wooden stick into the core of your apples dip carefully into the caramel until fully coated. Roll the dipped apples into the chopped pecans and place onto a piece of parchment paper.  Allow to cool completely before serving.

We’d love to hear from you with your favourite honey themed recipes – please send them here!

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Happy UK Wool Week!

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So you may not know, but this week (10- 16th October) marks UK Wool Week! Here at DrBeekeeper we love to support natural industries and UK manufacturing… and like honey, there’s not many products more natural than wool! So we thought we’d celebrate wool by making our very own pompom Bertrand in beautiful woolen yarn!

The Campaign for Wool

Download the tutorial here

We hope you enjoy the easy tutorial. It’s very simple and a perfect kids activity for the up-coming October half-term.

Find out more about The Campaign for Wool’s annual Wool Week here:

http://www.campaignforwool.org/2016/09/16/woolweek-our-annual-feast-of-fleece-returns/

Enjoy!

DrB & Bertrand

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Introducing Bertrand the bee!

Bertrand basking in the sunshine and appreciating views from the top of the Rock Garden

As you know, I love to travel and explore new places and it’s nice to have someone to share those experiences with. So here’s introducing my friend, Bertrand on our recent trip to RHS Garden Wisley in Woking, Surrey.
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Bertrand and I had great fun exploring the range of landscaping on offer at Wisley and were particularly taken aback by the lily-spotted canal in front of the laboratory building and views from the rock garden.

 

Wisley is famed for its extensive range of planting including alpine and tropical specimens in the extensive glass houses.  What we particularly liked were the model gardens, which are designed to show how much can be done in small spaces It’s the perfect place to come for ideas for your own garden. We certainly recommend a visit!

 

A breathtaking view of the canal fronting the Grade II listed laboratory building
A breathtaking view of the canal fronting the Grade II listed laboratory building

I wonder where we’ll visit next?

Until next time,

DrB & Bertrand

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A flying visit to Kew Gardens….

The Hive
The Hive is surrounded by a beautiful range of wildflowers and grasses… perfectly suited to pollinating bees

This summer DrBeekeeper visited a fantastic new installation called ‘The Hive’ by Wolfgang Buttress at Kew Gardens, London.

The Hive is constructed of thousands of pieces of aluminium trussed together to form a lattice or honeycomb effect. It really is awe- inspiring to look at!

A view from below looking up at the metal structure
A view from below looking up at the metal structure

Now here’s the clever bit… the structure is fitted with speakers and LED lights which respond to the energy levels in a real, active hive on the Kew site. The light and sound patterns change in line with surges in activity in the parent hive.  The installation encapsulates all the senses associated with being a real bee in a working hive. The Hive is set in a garden of wildflowers and grasses, which deserve appreciation on their own.

A must see for anyone interested in beekeeping and botanical art.

Find out more at:
http://www.kew.org/visit-kew-gardens/explore/attractions/hive

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DrBeekeeper’s Rice, Date and Honey Pudding

This simple but delicious recipe is sweetened naturally with DrBeekeeper honey and dates. A perfect way to end a long day of fasting, but equally great as a simple desert that can be enjoyed at any time!

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 60 minutes

Serves 4 – 6

Ingredients

  • 500ml water
  • 130 g pudding rice
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 50 g finely cut pitted dates
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon rind (optional)
  • Cream (optional)
  • cinnamon (to taste)
  • nutmeg (to taste)
  • 570ml/1 pint milk
  • 55ml/2fl oz single cream
  • Seeds scraped from 1 vanilla pod or ½ tsp vanilla extract (optional)
  • 4 eggs, yolks only
  • 2 level tsp cornflour
  • 5 tbsp honey

Method

  1. Preheat Oven to: 160 degrees Celsius. Bring the water to the boil and add the rice and salt and cook until the rice tender. Drain the rice if necessary, and place it in a shallow oven-proof baking dish. Sprinkle with the dates.
  2. In a clean saucepan heat the milk, cream and vanilla seeds to simmering point over a low heat. Beat the honey, cornflour and egg yolks together with a balloon whisk. Add the hot milk on to the beaten eggs and mix well with the balloon whisk. Stir in the lemon rind, cinnamon and nutmeg and pour over the rice and dates.
  3. Bake the pudding for about 60 minutes, or until set.
  4. Serve slightly warm or cool, with cream if desired.

We’d love to hear from you with your favourite honey themed recipes – please send them here!

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DrBeekeeper’s Moroccan Semolina and Honey Porridge

It’s Ramadan and with people fasting as long as 17 hours a day, without food or drink, DrBeekeeper would like to share some great Ramadan Recipes!

This simple Moroccan semolina porridge is easy to prepare and can be served as a healthy desert or be enjoyed as part of a nutritious breakfast. The soup will thicken when it cools, but when reheating, just add a little water or milk to thin it to your preferred consistency.

DrBeekeeper's Moroccan Semolina and Honey Porridge

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Serves 4 – 6

Ingredients

  • 1 liter of water
  • 150 g coarse semolina
  • 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 1 litre milk
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 star anise seeds, or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons honey, or to taste

 

Method

  1. Bring the water to a boil and stir in the semolina and salt. Simmer gently, stirring frequently, for 10 to 15 minutes, until the semolina is tender and the mixture is quite thick.
  2. Stir in the milk, butter and star anise seeds. Bring back to a simmer, and cook for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the soup reaches a consistency you like. Then stir in the honey. Serve warm.

We’d love to hear from you with your favourite honey themed recipes – please send them here!

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Organic Honey – A sweet success for Cuba

Have a look at this great article in the Guardian that I wanted to share:

Organic honey is a sweet success for Cuba as other bee populations suffer

I had no idea that organic honey was such an important export industry for Cuba.  Incredibly all of the honey produced in Cuba is certified organic.  This is due to the absence of pesticides – the government was simply unable to afford to buy pesticides… DrBeekeeper would love to try this honey and will keep you posted!

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DrBeekeeper’s Honey Roast Lamb Recipe

Honey works really very well in a marinade for any roast meat. This is a great way of using up excess honey, or even honey that you might find you don’t enjoy on toast! Better to use it in this succulent lamb dish then let it linger at the back of your store cupboard…

Ingredients

  • 1 shoulder of lamb
  • 4 tbsp DrBeekeeper honey
  • 2 tbsp light olive oil (no need to use extra virgin oil for this recipe!)
  • zest of 1 orange and 1 lemon
  • juice of 2 lemons
  • 5 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 1 tsp salt (or to taste)
  • 1 tsp black pepper (or to taste)

Method

  1. Mix all the spices, honey, orange and lemon zest and garlic in a bowl.
  2. Stir in the lemon juice and olive oil. Marinade your lamb thoroughly, cut slits into the meat to allow all the flavour to saturate the meat.
  3. Set aside for as long as you can, ideally overnight.
  4. Place the pan in a heavy based roasting tin, and roast in a hot oven (210C) for 30 mins, then baste the meat and turn the heat down to 160C. Slow roast the lamb for around 2hrs. Don’t allow the meat to dry up!This is a great dish. Serve with vegetables of your choice!  I often cook the veg in the same dish as the lamb, which is not only very efficient, but the veg soak up all of those amazing juices!!

We’d love to hear from you with your favourite honey themed recipes – please send them here!